Episode 137

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No matter what kind of agency you own, where it’s located, or how large it is – there is a truth about your business. You are literally and figuratively on stage every single day. Whether you’re on the phone with a client, sitting across the table from a few people, or standing on the stage at a national conference, we are constantly presenting.

We can’t afford to be shy about presenting. I’m not suggesting you do a TED talk but I am suggesting that you can’t afford to shirk away from any stage, big or small. You’ve heard me talk about the value of speaking as a way of creating cornerstone content but today I want to focus on a different aspect of presenting – selling from the stage (whatever that stage may be).

This week’s podcast guest loves to talk to business owners about how to do that bigger and better, and bolder. Dustin Mathews is an author of many best-selling books, and he has shared the stage with athletes, business celebrities, and titans of business. His latest book, “The No BS Guide to Powerful Presentations: How to Sell Anything with Webinars and Online Media Speeches and Seminars” is going to be a book that you are going to not only read but underline and highlight and share with others. That I promise you.

Dustin is known for creating content that drives people to buy products en masse. His companies and private clients have been featured on Forbes, Entrepreneur, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and Inc magazine. He’s literally marketed and filled over 3,000 events and has led 10 online product options. He and his work had generated over $43 million in sales. So he knows how to package and sell value.

As a part of prepping for the work that he’s doing today, he did some recent research and has identified a process for creating and selling products and services that he calls the Irresistible Offer Architecture that is so unique that he was able to get recognition by the US Patent and Trademark Office.

 

 

What you’ll learn about in this episode:

  • Why it takes practice to get comfortable with public speaking
  • Testing and getting feedback on material before presenting it to a large audience
  • Why it doesn’t matter how qualified you look if you’re able to speak to someone’s pain point
  • Giving a speech that gets people to take the next steps you want them to take
  • How to sell at conferences when you’re told “don’t sell from the stage”
  • Creating excitement about your offer by teasing coming next in your presentation
  • The five elements every presentation should have
  • Giving people value in your speeches before giving them the ask
  • Separating your agency from your competition by giving your processes a name
  • Why you need to showcase case studies in your presentations to show off your expertise
  • The nine elements of the irresistible offer architecture
  • Why you should give people a physical giveaway (book, flash drive, etc.) whenever you can
  • How to overcome your prospects’ objections
  • Reverse engineering your presentations based on what you want to offer at the end
  • Why you have to get good at speaking now

The Golden Nuggets:

“It doesn't matter your age. It doesn't matter your race or your gender. If you're in front of the right audience and they have a big enough pain, they will listen to anybody to solve that pain.” - @dustinmathews Click To Tweet “Anyone of stature is properly introduced before they make comments. Nothing says you have earned your position on that stage more than having a worthy introduction.” - @dustinmathews Click To Tweet “The whole reason why you speak to an audience is to provide them a solution, but before you go for the sale, you have to build value. More than ever before, this is critical.” - @dustinmathews Click To Tweet “Whatever your point of view, your methodology, your process -- own it. Help the audience believe you can help them get the results they need.” - @dustinmathews Click To Tweet “Create your offer first and then reverse engineer your whole presentation from there. If the story isn’t making sense, the offer won’t either.’” - @dustinmathews Click To Tweet “Practice speaking. Be a content producer. You don’t have to sit down and write a blog every day, but if you get interviewed or talk to people at conferences and try different material, life is going to get a whole lot easier.” - @dustinmathews Click To Tweet “We are under the gun as agency owners to put out a message. A lot of people are putting out messages, but is it leading to a sale?” - @dustinmathews Click To Tweet

 

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We’re proud to announce that Hubspot is now the presenting sponsor of the Build A Better Agency podcast! Many thanks to them for their support!

Speaker 1:

If you’re going to take the risk of running an agency, shouldn’t you get the benefits too? Welcome to Agency Management Institute’s Build a Better Agency podcast presented by HubSpot. We’ll show you how to build an agency that can scale and grow with better clients, invested employees, and best of all, more money to the bottom line. Bringing his 25 plus years of experience as both an agency owner and agency consultant, please welcome your host, Drew McLellan.

Drew McLellan:

Hey, everybody. Drew McLellan here with another episode of Build a Better Agency. One of the things that is true about our business and I don’t care if you run a media shop, or a web dev shop or a traditional ad agency, we are literally and figuratively on stage every single day, whether you’re on the phone with a client in a Zoom meeting, standing at a conference on the stage, presenting something that is thought leadership piece for you. We are constantly presenting, and the guest that I have today is going to talk to us about how to do that bigger and better and bolder.

So let me tell you a little bit about him, because I want to jump right into the conversation. So Dustin Mathews is an author of many best selling books and has shared the stage with athletes, business celebrities and the titans of business. His latest book, The No BS Guide to Powerful Presentations, how to sell anything with webinars and online media speeches and seminars is going to be a book that you are going to not only read, but underline and highlight and share with others. That I promise you.

Dustin is known for creating marketplace frenzies that drive people to buy products in mass. His companies and private clients have been featured on Forbes, Entrepreneur, Wall Street Journal, USA Today and Inc. Magazine. He has literally marketed and filled over 3,000 events and has led 10 online product launches. He and his work have generated over $43 million in sales. So as a part of him prepping for the work that he’s doing today, he did some recent research and he has now identified a process for creating and selling products and services that he calls the Irresistible Offer Architecture, which we’re going to dig into.

That is so unique that he was able to get recognition by the US Patent and Trademark Office. So I can’t wait to have this conversation.   that I’m presenting everyday, heck I’m presenting to you right now, even though odds are you’re just listening to me. So I’m going to be taking copious notes. So with that, Dustin, welcome to the show.

Dustin Mathews:

Drew, I’m thrilled and fired up to be here and share what wisdom I can to make us all get more clients and have more fun, that’s for sure.

Drew McLellan:

I like it. I like it. So, as I said in the intro, agency folks are constantly presenting, and yet, for most of them, they would rather chew off their own left foot than step on a stage or be in front of a big crowd, and that’s a pretty common fear, isn’t it?

Dustin Mathews:

Yeah, absolutely. I’ll share this. I wasn’t the guy that wanted to do it either. So I can totally relate. In school, I was so motivated to not do this, present in front of others on a stage and in microphones that I found a loophole to get out of public speaking. So I think it’s funny now because I run a company called speakingempire.com that shows people how to do that and that’s been my passion, ever since I figured out that there’s a big benefit to doing it even though you may have fear, even though you may not want to do it.

Drew McLellan:

So my guess is that you present all the time given what it is you have expertise in. So how did you go from the kid who dodged the class and would have done anything not to speak to being comfortable in any setting, whether it’s you’re presenting to one person or 10,000?

Dustin Mathews:

Well, I think two things. One is trial by fire. So everyone wants to shortcut. Heck, I want shortcuts and other parts of my business. Things that I’m not the expert at, like HR, and processes and systems. So I’m always looking for the guy or the shortcut or the book. So I think it’s funny, because at the end of the day, to really be a master, to really get expertise in any area and results, you have to dive in. So I was fortunate to have a mentor push me into the fire and I just simply had to do it.

Drew McLellan:

I think for agency folks, we are doing it every day, whether you like it or not. You may not be stepping on a stage to speak at a conference or trade show, but you’re presenting every single day. Even when you’re presenting to your employees, you’re presenting. So I think part of it is also a mindset of recognizing that you’ve already done it thousands and thousands of times and nobody died. Your pants didn’t drop, there was nothing horrible happened. Even if you weren’t as eloquent as you want it to be, as long as you get your message across, okay.

Dustin Mathews:

Drew, you’re absolutely right. Once I figured out that I needed to do it, then I started looking at all the things, and I didn’t have this stuff even five years ago, but if you look at podcasts, Facebook Lives, Periscopes, heck, one-on-one meetings or board meetings or department meetings, we all are presenting, and we have an opportunity to try a little material. The thing I like to share, Drew is this.

I think of a comedian, let’s say Chris Rock. Before he goes out on his world tour, or shows on HBO, he’s in the little dive comedy club under a pen name trying out material. So whether you’re an agency owner, or part of the agency staff, we have these opportunities where we can try a little material and wrap it into … Maybe, we speak on a stage or maybe we’ve got that webinar coming up. So practice, test the material, get that feedback, because you’re already doing it anyway. It’s just bringing that awareness.

Drew McLellan:

So clearly, by writing the book, you have an opinion that not only is it something we’re doing every day, but that there’s value in it. So talk to us a little bit about how you, again, evolved your opinion about this, and to the point where you now believe it’s really one of the most powerful ways to communicate.

Dustin Mathews:

That’s a good question. So I think back to when I first … I left school and my mentor made me do it. So here I was, and if you see a picture of me or happen to catch a clip or something online, you’ll see my face and you’ll see that I have somewhat of a … Drew, do I still have the baby face? Can you still see it?

Drew McLellan:

A little bit.

Dustin Mathews:

A little bit. With age, I’m learning it [inaudible 00:06:37]. When I was first getting started 10 years ago, I must have looked 16 at the time and talking to people, sometimes triple my age in the audience I said, “No one’s going to take me seriously.” So when I got up there I presented, it wasn’t as bad as I thought it was and people came up, and they bought, and they asked me questions.

So all this fear, it was a mindset. So the reason why I get so passionate about this is that it doesn’t matter your age, it doesn’t matter your race, your gender. If you’re in front of the right audience, and they have a big enough pain, they will listen to anybody to solve that pain. If you think about if you’ve ever had health issues, or know people in your family that may have had it, they’re a receptive crowd. So as long as you’re in front of that right crowd and you deliver the goods, you deliver value, then people will respond. So I recognized that early on, and now that’s been my passion to share it with others.

Drew McLellan:

So I know you hold the belief that a single presentation can literally make you rich, and that most people don’t approach presentations, again, whether they’re informal or formal, with that mindset. So help us wrap our head around that idea a little bit, and how does one change their frame of reference so that they do approach those presentations with the weight that they deserve?

Dustin Mathews:

Well, that’s a good point. So I will say this, politicians, whether you’re into politics or not, they’re known for having a stump speech. I think as an agency owner, you ought to have a stump speech. Not to say that you’re not going to customize if you’re in front of a Fortune 500, or you’re in front of Mom and Pop store. Yes, there will be customization, just like a politician will customize depending on if he’s speaking, or she’s speaking to union workers, or the teachers’ guild or whatever.

So you ought to have some form of message that 75 to 80% is the same thing, but you customize and tweak it. So in the agency world, what I see a huge opportunity is this idea of running a webinar, whether you automate it, or you train team members, or you’re doing it yourself, having this speech that really sets up appointments.

So I know that’s a big claim that one presentation can make you rich or make me wealthy, but it’s absolutely true. Because when you start to design it, when you start to put together a message, not just to educate people, but get people into action, that’s where it can make you rich. What I mean by that is donations, appointments, if you’re setting appointments, or if you’re in a position to ask for the sale from the stage or from a webinar, then do that.

The challenge is most people wait to the night before, they don’t give it really much thought, they’re teaching too much and they’re not thinking about how do I give a message that gets people to take the next step that I would like them to take.

Drew McLellan:

Do most people try and get them to take too big … So they either go no step or they go right from walking in the bar, walking up to somebody and saying, “Hi, it’s really nice to meet you. Can I buy you a drink, and oh, do you want to get married?”

Dustin Mathews:

Well, yes, but that second, the first step is, oh, I’m going to teach you to death and I’m going to show you all the impressive accolades and all the features of what we’ve done here. Look at the 17 awards that we’ve won, and then there’s no close and there’s no call to action. So first is just trying to educate, hoping that someone will say, “Oh, wow, I really like him and his agency or her agency, and I take the next step.”

Then yes. Then there’s the second category, which is they go in for the sale. I see that a lot less than the first category, but yes, absolutely. So you’ve got to deliver value at the end of the day, and you’ve got to think about what’s the next step that you want them to take. It may be a sale, but oftentimes not.

Drew McLellan:

So especially if someone’s been invited to present at a conference or something like that, they’re often told not to sell from the stage. So how do you recommend someone bakes the, let’s take an action into a presentation like that, when they’ve sort of been given the message.

Dustin Mathews:

This is very good, because I know a lot of agency owners that present in that world. Associations, corporate environments, boardrooms, you can’t be so forward, as if you go to a seminar where you see people selling things. So I completely understand that. So Drew, you’re going to have to hold me back and chop me up a little bit, because I got a lot to say here.

Drew McLellan:

No. Bring it, bring it.

Dustin Mathews:

All right, remind me by the way, Drew, if we have time, I want to give the structure, the framework of five elements of a presentation, no matter what you’re doing. So remind me on that.

Drew McLellan:

We’ll get back to that, I promise.

Dustin Mathews:

So number one is if you can do it is bring a team. So if you’re going to speak in an environment, maybe there’s booths or there’s sponsors there. So yes, you can’t sell from the stage, however, you could direct people to your booth. So if you brought a team, you brought your sales executives, your sales personnel with you there, you could not sell, but you could drive people for free sessions or free critiques.

Let’s look at your Facebook account, let’s look at your ad spend. You could give them value from the state and say, “Listen, normally we charge X to do this. Because I’m here and speaking, go see the team in the back.” The second thing I would say is you should be generating leads. So there’s a bunch of cool tools that we use.

Fix Your Funnel, or basic SMS mobile text messaging. So let’s say you got 60 minutes to talk Drew. You got hours, you got days, you got years of content in your head, there’s no way you could get through. So that’s the pitch I use. “Hey, listen, I’m going to show you what’s working now. What’s best, as much as I can get in and they 60 minutes and there’s a bunch of resources I want to give you.”

So if you take out your phone right now, and you text, blah, blah, blah to blah, blah, blah, now we’re generating leads. So we’re not selling, we’re delivering value, we’re giving massive value. So I come in with that, doing SMS and then the other thing I do if Facebook is relevant, I tell people to go to our Facebook page and type in a word there and opt in there.

So not only do I get SMS, but I get people to opt in to Facebook through mini chat, if you’re curious. So I generate leads there and then ideally, if I can push them to a booth that I have, great, or the last option and I’ll be quiet here on this one, the last option is if it’s okay with the promoter, having a breakout lunch, or having a breakfast the next day, or depending on time-wise. So if you can’t sell in that environment, take them to an environment that you may be able to control.

Drew McLellan:

So you would invite them from the stage to this breakfast or lunch or whatever it is?

Dustin Mathews:

Absolutely.

Drew McLellan:

Is that what you’re saying?

Dustin Mathews:

Yeah, of course. I want to do a little asterisk here. Of course, with the promoter’s permission, because you don’t want to make them mad. You don’t want to do it during their time and you take 100 people out of the room, it would look bad. So you want to get that permission but if you can’t sell, say, great. Well, how can I at least generate leads, or how can I invite them to an environment I can control? Maybe it’s an after webinar, after the event webinar that they would get access to. Ideally, I want to get them there to have a conversation because it’s so strong to be personal face to face, but those are the scenarios that you can run.

Drew McLellan:

So one of the takeaways for me as I’m listening to you talk is, again, I’m not trying to drive to this sale, but I’ve been intentional about what is the action that I want them to take next.

Dustin Mathews:

Yes, and it doesn’t have to be one. So if you notice I said drive them mobile. Get them on Facebook. So now we can follow up after the fact, and then if you can be so bold or so forward to drive them to your booth, that’s another action or invite them to a lunch. I much prefer face to face interaction, because there’s power to that, but I also know sometimes the promoter, the speaker, the forum just won’t allow for that. So great, I’ll just generate leads and I’ll follow up with a few people.

Drew McLellan:

Do you recommend that you just weave and pepper those into your presentation? Do you start with that? Do you end with that or doesn’t it matter? Is there a proper place to put that?

Dustin Mathews:

Yeah, definitely I like to do it like a quarter of the way through and three quarters. So if you break up your presentation into four parts for this specific purpose, you want to build some rapport, you want to get up enrolling, you want peop